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Artist Prints - Marc-Antoine Coulon

Marc Antoine Coulon

“I’m not comfortable with faceless models. I need to create something that’s alive, dancing… I need to hear music”

Marc-Antoine Coulon 1974

When it comes to fashion illustration and celebrity portraits, no one comes across as prolific and maven as Marc-Antoine Coulon who, for the past three years, has been capturing the best of the worlds runways through his distinctive illustrations and portraits.

As far back as he can remember Coulon has always drawn, he’s always had a pen or paintbrush in his hand. At the age of two he recalls himself hesitating between two shades of blue at the Kitchen table, it was a fait accompli. René Gruau was an early influence, his strong fluid lines made a lasting impression on young Coulon as did the hard shapes of Constance Wibaut, and the windy portraits of Just Jaeckin. But it was a retrospective of Gruau’s work in an issue of Figaro Magazine that finally drew Coulon to Fashion Ilustration.

“There’s a lot more to fashion illustration than merely reproducing fabrics”, says Coulon. “Clothes are like pearls, they die if no one wears them. I want to convey the mood of the model, to make them witty and desirable. To capture the essence of the moment”.

While His fashion illustration is featured regularly in L’Official and Blake Magazines. Coluan has become highly sought after for his elegant depictions of the bold and the beautiful. The broad sweep of his brush recording the faces of some of the world’s most desirable men and women with his signature economy of line.

“I like to simplify and eliminate extraneous details”, he says “my goal is to create something that looks as effortless as possible. Which of course it isn’t”.

Anyone with enough schooling can draw or paint an interior and give us a sense of what it looks like - where things are, furniture and fabric choices, colour, lighting, and so on. And that is enough for many. It takes a really fine artist, however, to go beyond that and give us the sense of being in the room, of being able to move about in the space, touch, react, get beyond the facts to the reasoning behind them.

A drawing or painting of an environment must do more for us than a colour photograph would-if the result is to transcend journalism. It must give us the experience of the thing. For us to penetrate into the picture a certain interesting and inventive distortion must take place.

A wall, for example, must not be literal: the artist must give us a sense of the wall, how it functions in and relates to its environment, not simply how it is, or looks.

Edward Albee

Signature
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon
Marc Antoine Coulon